BOOKS



This page contains references to the Huntriss name in various books.




TitleAuthorDescription
A mouse is bornAnita LoosAnita Loos was an acclaimed American screenwriter, playwright and author, whose best known work was "Gentlemen prefer Blondes".

She wrote "A Mouse is born" in 1951, an autobiography of Effie Huntriss, a fictional Hollywood starlet.

The book was reviewed in the June 1951 edition of Time magazine.
Hurry the darknessMaurice Procter A novel, set in the north of England, in which (Rose)Bud Huntriss is one of the characters. Whilst all the characters are fictional, the author, worked in the Halifax area, which could suggest that he was aware of the Huntriss family name. William Huntriss was a mill owner in Halifax.
A Farrago of Lies Trevor TilkaAn Australian novel in which Myra Huntriss is an Estate Agent
Death by Aloe Seed Julius FalconerAn excellent detective story by Julius Falconer set in Sherburn-in-Elmet (the village in which several of my ancestors lived) This second chronicle of the doings of the vicar of Sherburn (in which Joseph Huntriss makes a brief but telling appearance) draws the reader cosily into eighteenth-century village life where medicine is primitive, travel arduous and time-consuming, curses feared and officers of the law less than eager to pursue their functions. I made contact with Julius Falconer, who told me that for the purposes of authenticity, the names of his (entirely fictional) characters were drawn from the parish records of the time, with Christian and surnames mismatched to avoid any confusion with actual people.
The Rose of Wharfedale Albert WalkerA fictional account of the Otley maypole celebrations of 1811.




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